Session note Session notes

Session notes for Making up songs Stages: 3 to 5 years

Notes

In preparation for your whānau visit, read the recommended reading Music with children aged 3–5 years and Whakatipu booklet Te Māhuri 2, pages 16 and 17.

Pātai atu ki te whānau:

  • What sort of music do you and your tamaiti enjoy each day?
  • Does your tamaiti have a favourite song?
  • Do you sing together around the house?
  • What do you think your tamaiti is learning when you sing together as you work and play?

Making up songs is fun!

Look at Te Māhuri 2 pages 16 and 17. There are so many things that music helps children learn. Creativity is one. And making up songs can be a lot of fun, as it appeals to this age-group’s sense of humour.

A quick and easy way to start is making up new verses to familiar songs — for example, ‘The Wheels on the Bus’. How about including the nannies on the bus — what could they do? Who else could be on this bus?

Another example could be ‘The Hokey Tokey’ — how about singing ‘To pōtae ki roto, To pōtae ki waho’ and then adding in other items. How about changing ‘hope hope’ and ‘hurihuri’? What are some other actions? Peke peke (jump!), hikihiki (shrug!), kopakopa (fly about!).

Whānau may feel they can try making up a song about what their tamaiti is doing, using a tune they know. For example, to the tune of ‘Here we go round the mulberry bush’, you could make up a song for getting dressed: ‘This is the way we put on our undies [socks, shirt, skirt, pants]’, and so on.

The next step could be to make up a different tune to go with new lyrics. How about some lines about driving in the car or catching the bus?

 When we go to town

 We always catch the bus

 First we pay the driver

 And find a seat no fuss

 

 When we get to town

 I press to make it stop

 Down the steps I go

 We’re here at the shop

Children usually like songs with their names in them. Changing the characters in a song or rhyme and replacing the original with the child’s name can be fun. Some ideas of songs to play around with:

  • ‘Jack and Jill’
  • ‘Two little dickie birds’
  • ‘Little Jack Horner’

The things to remember are:

  • Simple lyrics
  • Regular beat
  • Sing about the world of the tamaiti
  • It doesn’t have to rhyme
  • You don’t have to be able to sing in tune
  • It can be as silly as you like

How does this relate to the SKIP resources?

Baby wall frieze - Waiata mai.  Sing to me, and we can sing togetherOpens in new window

Six things children need - Te kōrero me te whakarongo. Talking and listening, because our songs are just like musical conversationsOpens in new window

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